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I’ll be first to admit that in the beginning, I was a little wary of NBC’s Elementary when it was first released a few years ago. Fiercely protective of the adherence to a classic Sherlock Holmes approach, my viewing reach only went so far as BBC’s modern deviation Sherlock. I recall my argument being something like “no matter when you set it, London is a character in this story, and you can’t break the rules that Conan Doyle set down regarding the setting and characters, darnit!” Goodness, I was prejudiced.

I gave the Americanized version, set in New York City, a shot, and I was so very pleasantly surprised. The show-runners and writers had managed to preserve the integrity of the relationships that made the classic Holmesian adventures so compelling. It didn’t matter an inch that London had been abandoned by the British import, now a recovering junkie fated to meet a powerhouse named Watson. It didn’t matter that this powerhouse just happened to be a woman. And it certainly didn’t matter that I still adored Sherlock just as much as ever.

As Elementary was introduced to the public, and as it took hold as a successful series, there seemed to open up a great big rift between the BBC acolytes and the NBC fandom. You were either one or the other. You were a hater either way.

While I hope I never became antagonistic, I knew once I began watching the show that I had joined a trend that created drama and issues where there was no need for any….

While its totally okay to be a purist, to prefer a classic to a new interpretation or vice versa, and to criticize that which you think needs it, I really feel that its also okay to simply let things be.

I, for one, now find myself embedded in both worlds, the BBC and the NBC. I love both Sherlocks and Watsons for different reasons! This whole experience got me thinking: is it really so important to be steadfastly against something new and creatively bold, just because you like something else to begin with? Maybe sometimes its more fun to have a taste of both, and see if you can’t make friends all around…

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